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Posada de las Minas

Mineral de Pozos, Guanajuato

Imaginative inn rising from the ruins of a picturesque mining/ghost town, beginning a new chapter as an artists’ community

From colonial outpost to boom gold and silver mining city to ghost town to laid-back artist colony, Mineral de Pozos (usually called Pozos) has a fascinatingly varied history dating back to the 16th century. A decade ago artists, photographers and visionaries like Texans David and Julie Winslow started moving in, drawn by the town’s mystical soul. Posada de las Minas, built in the 1890s and formerly a dress shop and general mercantile, had, like most of the town, fallen into ruin - abandoned to ghosts for most of the 20th century.

The Winslows, an engineer and interior designer with no previous experience running an inn, bought these few crumbling walls. They stayed true to the architectural, period and cultural details - rough-hewn stone, brick arches, intricate tile-work, hand-made crafts. The flower-filled courtyard is an oasis and imaginative touches - a sink sculpted like a gecko, hand-carved cactus bedposts - give the inn a singular charm rare in more discovered destinations.


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Highs

  • Spacious and imaginatively decorated bedrooms and apartments, some with private balconies and fully equipped kitchens
  • Landscaped cactus garden with a whirlpool
  • Friendly, cowboy-style bar and an excellent courtyard restaurant
  • Picture-frame views of the town and the surrounding mountains
  • The town of Pozos, declared a national historical monument, has been tagged "the next San Miguel de Allende" - go now to experience its history, mystery and artistic charm without the crowds

Lows

  • The friendly Mexican staff don’t speak much English, although there's a bilingual office manager
  • There's not much going on in Pozos after dark; if you thrive on nightlife, popular San Miguel de Allende (an hour south) or Guanajuato are better choices
  • There's little for kids to do; no pool and the inn’s DVD player is in the living room, although another is available for use in the rooms
  • Despite its remote location, Pozos can be a little noisy - from the clang of church bells to spontaneous celebratory explosions. Our Saturday breakfast was interrupted by half a dozen sonic blasts made by locals firing off homemade cannons
Save to favouritesPrintMailPosada de las MinasFrom colonial outpost to boom gold and silver mining city to ghost town to laid-back artist colony, Mineral de Pozos (usually called Pozos) has a fascinatingly varied history dating back to the 16th century. A decade ago artists, photographers and visionaries like Texans David and Julie Winslow started moving in, drawn by the town’s mystical soul. Posada de las Minas, built in the 1890s and formerly a dress shop and general mercantile, had, like most of the town, fallen into ruin - abandoned to ghosts for most of the 20th century. The Winslows, an engineer and interior designer with no previous experience running an inn, bought these few crumbling walls. They stayed true to the architectural, period and cultural details - rough-hewn stone, brick arches, intricate tile-work, hand-made crafts. The flower-filled courtyard is an oasis and imaginative touches - a sink sculpted like a gecko, hand-carved cactus bedposts - give the inn a singular charm rare in more discovered destinations.

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